Archives For November 30, 1999

ubuntu desktop shortcuts

This quick tutorial shows you how to easily create applications shortcut icons on your Ubuntu’s default Unity Desktop.

Due to permission issue, it’s not possible to drag and drop application shortcuts from the Unity Dash to the Desktop. You will get below error dialog when trying to do so:

As a workaround we can directly copy and paste the application shortcuts from /usr/share/applications directory into desktop.

1.) Open “Files”, Nautilus file browser, from the left Launcher and navigate to Computer (left panel) / usr / share / applications.

You will see all the applications’ icons there.

2.) Select one or more icons and press Ctrl+C to copy it/them. Then click on blank area of your desktop and press Ctrl+V to paste the icon(s). Note that drop and drop won’t work

That’s it, just so easy!

3.) For those who want to place Home, Network, Trash, and Devices icons on desktop, open Unity Tweak Tool (available in Ubuntu Software Center) from the Unity Dash and enable them from Desktop Icons utility.

Tor Browser 4.0 has been released recently with important security updates to Firefox and SSLv3 disabled due to the POODLE attack.

The first release of the 4.0 series is available from the Tor Browser Project page and also from our distribution directory.

This release features important security updates to Firefox. Additionally, due to the POODLE attack, we have also disabled SSLv3 in this release.

The primary user-facing change since the 3.6 series is the transition to Firefox 31-ESR.

More importantly for censored users who were using 3.6, the 4.0 series also features the addition of three versions of the meek pluggable transport.

via the official announcement

Thanks to Web Upd8 Team, the binary packages have been made into PPA, available for Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04, Ubuntu 12.04 and their derivatives.

To install Tor Browser, press Ctrl+Alt+T to open terminal. When it opens, run the commands below one by one:

sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:webupd8team/tor-browser 

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install tor-browser

If you don’t want to add the PPA, grab the .deb installer directly from the Launchpad page.

Once installed, open Tor Browser from Unity Dash or menu and enjoy!

How to Install VMware Player in Ubuntu 14.10

Last updated: October 14, 2014

Prefer VMware Player to Oracle VirtualBox? Well, this quick tutorial will show you how to install the VMware Player 6 in Ubuntu 14.10.

VMware Player is one of the best virtualization software for Linux that allows you to run another operating system inside the current OS. It’s free for non-commercial use.

1. To get started, press Ctrl+Alt+T to open terminal. When it opens, paste the command below and run to install required build package and kernel headers:

sudo apt-get install build-essential linux-headers-$(uname -r)

2. Click on this link to go to the official download page and select downloading the VMware Player for Linux 32-bit / 64-bit.

You may check your OS type, 32-bit or 64-bit, by clicking on the option “About This Computer” from shutdown menu (top-right corner gear button).

3. Once the downloading process finished. Make the package executable by:

  1. Open file browser and navigate to Downloads folder.
  2. Right-click on the VMware Player package and select Properties.
  3. Under Permissions tab, check the box that says “allow executing file as program”

4. Finally in a terminal window (Ctrl+Alt+T) run below command to bring up VMware Player installer wizard:

gksudo bash ~/Downloads/VMware-Player-*.bundle

Follow the wizard. When done, open VMware Player from the Unity Dash or menu and enjoy!

How to Install Sublime Text 2 / 3 in Ubuntu 14.10

Last updated: October 13, 2014

Quick tutorial to install Sublime Text 2 stable, so far its 2.0.2, or Sublime Text 3 Beta in Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn.

Sublime Text is a close-source text and code source editor with an Python API. It may be downloaded and evaluated for free, however a license must be purchased for continued use.

For the features and supported languages, see the wikipedia page.

Sublime Text 2 in Ubuntu 14.10

Install Sublime Text in Ubuntu:

Thanks to WebUpd8 Team, an installer has been made into PPA that automatically downloads the stable or beta release of Sublime Text from its official site and installs it on your system.

Press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open the terminal. When it opens, run below commands one by one:

To install Sublime Text stable:

sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:webupd8team/sublime-text-2

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install sublime-text

When running the first command, you will be asked to type in user password and there will be no visual feed back.

To install Sublime Text 3 Beta:

sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:webupd8team/sublime-text-3

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install sublime-text-installer

Once installed, launch the editor from the Unity Dash or menu and enjoy!

Enable Flash for Chromium Browser in Ubuntu 14.10

Last updated: October 10, 2014

If you’re using a Chromium based web browser in Ubuntu, you may find that the Adobe Flash Player installed from Ubuntu Software Center does not work all the time.

Because ‘Aura’ for Linux, which replaces GTK+, lacks coded support for NPAPI plugins, the “old” Adobe plugin in Ubuntu repositories does no longer play Flash content in Chromium based web browser.

As a workaround, you can use the ‘Pepper Flash’ which is bundled with Google Chrome that provides the latest Adobe Flash Player for Linux.

Chromium with Lastest Adobe Flash

1. Click the link below to bring up Ubuntu Software Center and click the install button:

This will install the package “Pepperflashplugin-nonfree“, which will download Chrome from Google, unpack it and make the included Pepper Flash Player available for use with Chromium.

2. After that, relaunch Chromium browser and Flash should now work. If not, close the browser and run below command in terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) to tell the plugin location:

sudo update-pepperflashplugin-nonfree --install

That’s it. Enjoy!

How to Enable Flash for Firefox in Ubuntu 14.10

Last updated: October 10, 2014

Firefox browser does not play flash out-of-the-box in Ubuntu. We need to manually install the Adobe Flash Player and below is how.

As you may know, Adobe abandoned flash for Linux in 2012. For Flash Player releases after 11.2, the Flash Player browser plugin for Linux will only be available via the “Pepper” API as part of the Google Chrome browser. Adobe will provide security updates for Flash Player 11.2 for five years.

The Adobe Flash Player 11.2.x is still available in Ubuntu repositories and below is how to install it in Ubuntu 14.10.

Click the link below to bring up Ubuntu Software Center and click the install button:

The package doesn’t contain the actual flash player, it’s only an installer that automatically downloads and installs the source tarball from the Canonical Partners repository.

If you have already enabled Canonical Partners repository, available in Software & Updates -> Other Software tab, you can directly install the Flash Player (the real package) package from Ubuntu Software Center:

Once installed, re-launch your Firefox browser and enjoy!

Prefer to launch a cascading menu rather than search application from Unity Dash? Well, here is how to install the classic Gnome Menu in Ubuntu 14.10.

ClassicMenu indicator is a notification area applet for the top panel of Ubuntu Unity that provides a simple way to get a classic GNOME-style application menu for those who prefer this over the Unity dash menu.

To install the applet:

The developer has built the indicator binary into PPA. You can download the .deb package from the link below:

Download classicmenu-indicator_xxx_all.deb

Once the download process finished, double-click the package in file browser to open it with Ubuntu Software Center and click the install button.

Or install it via command in terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T):

sudo dpkg -i ~/Downloads/classicmenu-indicator_*.deb

When done, you can start the classic Gnome Menu from the Unity Dash, or let it open automatically at next log-in.

It’s easy to install Google Earth in a 32-bit Ubuntu machine. But 64-bit Ubuntu fails to install the official package due to the package dependencies ia32-libs is not available since Ubuntu 14.04.

A work-around is to install the 32-bit package in 64-bit Ubuntu and resolve the package dependencies manually.

Install Google Earth 7 in Ubuntu 14.10 64-bit:

1. First download the “32 bit .deb (For Debian/Ubuntu)” package from the earth.google.com:

Download Google Earth 32-bit .deb

2. During the downloading process, press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open the terminal. When it opens, paste the command below and hit run to install required libraries (thanks to webupd8):

sudo apt-get install libfontconfig1:i386 libx11-6:i386 libxrender1:i386 libxext6:i386 libgl1-mesa-glx:i386 libglu1-mesa:i386 libglib2.0-0:i386 libsm6:i386

Type in your user password when it asks, note that there’s no visual feed back.

3. Now install the downloaded package via Software Center, Gdebi, or by running below command in terminal:

sudo dpkg -i ~/Downloads/google-earth-stable_current_i386.deb; sudo apt-get -f install

When done, start Google Earth from Unity dash or application menu and enjoy!

Install Google Earth 6 in Ubuntu 14.10:

If for some reason you want to install the old Google Earth 6 in Ubuntu (both 32-bit and 64-bit). Follow the steps below:

1. First click the link below to install the package googleearth-package, a utility to automatically build a debian package of Google Earth:

2. Once installed, press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, run the command below to run the utility:

make-googleearth-package --force

The utility will automatically download the Google Earth 6 package from its official website and generate a .deb package installer from it.

3. Once the utility finished, you can see the new .deb package in your user home folder and install it via Ubuntu Software Center. Or run below command instead:

sudo dpkg -i googleearth_*.deb; sudo apt-get -f install

(Optional) To uninstall Google Earth 6 or 7 run command:

sudo dpkg -r googleearth google-earth-stable

Enjoy!

This quick tutorial shows you how to install the latest release of Quassel IRC client in Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04, Ubuntu 12.04 and derivatives via PPA.

Quassel is a modern, cross-platform, distributed KDE / Qt IRC client. One (or multiple) client(s) can attach to and detach from a central core. It’s much like the popular combination of screen and a text-based IRC client such as WeeChat, but graphical.

While Ubuntu 14.04 Software Center provides Quassel 0.10, the latest release has recently reached 0.11. See what’s new:

changes in v0.10.1:

  • Fix buffer hotlist sorting

  • Split CTCP messages if they’re too long

  • Make database problems more obvious

  • Fix backlog loading for QuasselDroid

  • Properly save the toolbar state on Mac OSX

  • Fix a crash with KDE’s network detection

  • Various other fixes

changes in v0.11.0:

  • New build requirements: C++11 capable compiler (gcc 4.7+, clang 3.3+, MSVC 2013+), cmake 2.8.9+

  • Full support for Qt 5.2+ in addition to Qt 4.6+

  • Completely revamp the build system, making use of “new” CMake features

Install Quassel IRC Clien via PPA:

Thanks to Michael Marley, a PPA repository has been created with the latest stable builds of Quassel packages for Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04, Ubuntu 12.04 and derivatives.

1. Press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, run the command below to add the PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mamarley/quassel

Type in your user password when it asks. Note that there is no visual feed back when you’re typing a password.

2. Then update and install the client:

For KDE build, run:

sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get install quassel

For Qt build, run:

sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get install quassel-qt4

Once installed, open the irc client from Unity dash or application menu and you can receive future updates by running regular update via Software Updater.

This tutorial shows how to install Pithos, a native Pandora Internet Radio client, in Ubuntu 14.04 or Ubuntu 14.10 via its PPA repository.

Pandora Radio is a music streaming and automated music recommendation service which is only available in the United States, Australia and New Zealand. The service plays musical selections of a certain genre based on the user’s artist selection.

Pithos is an open source Pandora Radio client for Linux. It’s much more lightweight than the Pandora.com web client, and integrates with desktop features such as media keys, notifications, and the sound menu.

The client features:

  • Play / Pause / Next Song
  • Switching stations
  • Remembering user name and password
  • Cover Art
  • Thumbs Up / Thumbs Down / Tired of this song
  • Notification popup with song info
  • Launching pandora.com song info page and station page
  • Reconnecting when pandora session times out
  • Editing QuickMix
  • Creating stations
  • Media Key support
  • Proxy support
  • Last.fm scrobbling

The latest release has reached v1.0.1, you can get the detailed changes from the github page.

Install Pithos in Ubuntu 14.10 / 14.04:

The developers have created a PPA repository that provides the latest packages for Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04 and their derivatives such as Linux Mint 17.

To install the client, press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, paste commands below and run one by one:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:pithos/ppa

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install pithos

If you don’t want to add the PPA, grab the .deb installer directly from the launchpad page.