Archives For Linux Kernel

Linux Kernel

Linus Torvalds finally announced the release of Linux Kernel 4.18 yesterday afternoon. He wrote in lkml.org:

It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates. Mostly networking, but some vfs race fixes (mentioned in the rc8 announment
as “pending”) and a couple of driver fixes (scsi, networking, i2c). Some other minor random things (arm crypto fix, parisc memory ordering fix). Shortlog appended for the (few) details.

Some of these I was almost ready to just delay to until the next merge window, but they were marked for stable anyway, so it would just have caused more backporting. The vfs fixes are for old races that are
really hard to hit (which is obviously why they are old and weren’t noticed earlier). Some of them _have_ been seen in real life, some of them probably need explicit help to ever trigger (ie artificial delays
just to show that “yes, this can actually happen in theory”).

Changes in kernel 4.18 include:

  • Initial support for the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 SoC.
  • Various power management improvements to AMDGPU
  • Initial NVIDIA GV100 Volta support within Nouveau DRM driver
  • 32-bit ARM finally gets mitigated for Spectre V1/V2
  • Various new sound chips support
  • USB 3.2 and USB Type-C improvements.
  • And many other changes.

How to Install Linux Kernel 4.18 in Ubuntu:

There a few tools, e.g., UKTools and Ukuu, make it easy to install the latest Kernel in Ubuntu.

You can also manually download the Kernel 4.18 Ubuntu binary packages at:

Download Kernel 4.18

Depends on your OS type, download and install the packages in turns:

  1. linux-headers-4.18.0-xxxxxx_all.deb
  2. linux-headers-4.18.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb
  3. linux-modules-4.18.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb
  4. linux-image-xxx-4.18.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb

Select generic for common system, and lowlatency for a low latency system (e.g. for recording audio), amd64 for 64bit system, i386 for 32bit system, or armhf, arm64, etc for other OS types.

Also you can download and install the kernel binaries via terminal commands:

For 64-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_all.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_amd64.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-image-unsigned-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_amd64.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-modules-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_amd64.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

for 32-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_all.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-headers-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_i386.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-image-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_i386.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.18/linux-modules-4.18.0-041800-generic_4.18.0-041800.201808122131_i386.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

Once installed, restart your computer and enjoy!

Uninstall Linux Kernel 4.17:

Restart your machine and select boot with the previous kernel in boot menu ‘Grub2 -> Advanced Option for Ubuntu’. Then run command to remove Linux Kernel 4.18.0:

sudo dpkg --purge linux-image-4.18.0-041800-generic linux-image-unsigned-4.18.0-041800-generic

Linux Kernel

There’s already a graphical tool called Ukuu which make it easy to install the latest Linux Kernels in Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

Today I’m going to show you a new command line tool called UKTools which provides:

  • uktools-upgrade, one command to install the latest Linux kernel (stable) from kernel.ubuntu.com.

  • uktools-purge, one command to remove old kernels, the first and the last two are excluded.

The tools also support cron jobs to automatically run upgrade and/or purge scripts.

NOTE that the mainline kernels are provided by Ubuntu Kernel Team for testing and debugging purposes. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use. You should only install these if they may fix a critical problem you’re having with the current kernel. Read more about mainline kernels.

How to Install UKTools in Ubuntu:

The application does not has any Ubuntu binary at the moment. However, it’s easy to compile it from the source.

1. Open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and clone the source via command:

git clone https://github.com/usbkey9/uktools && cd uktools

2. Then compile and install it via command:

make

The setup runs automatically if it’s installed successfully.

Uninstall:

Keep the uktools folder in your user root directory, so you can re-run UKTools setup, or remove the command line tool via command:

cd ~/uktools/ && make uninstall

Linux Kernel

Linux Kernel 4.17 was finally announced yesterday. Linus Torvalds wrote in lkml.org:

So this last week was pretty calm, even if the pattern of most of the stuff coming in on a Friday made it feel less so as the weekend approached.

And while I would have liked even less changes, I really didn’t get the feeling that another week would help the release in any way, so here we are, with 4.17 released.

No, I didn’t call it 5.0, even though all the git object count numerology was in place for that. It will happen in the not _too_ distant future, and I’m told all the release scripts on kernel.org are ready for it, but I didn’t feel there was any real reason for it. I suspect that around 4.20 – which is I run out of fingers and toes to keep track of minor releases, and thus start getting mightily confused – I’ll switch over. That was what happened for 4.0, after all.

As for the actual changes since rc7 – the shortlog is appended – it’s mostly drivers, networking, perf tooling, and a set of nds32 fixes. With some random other stuff thrown in. Again, the shortlog is obviously only the last calm week, the overall changes since 4.16 are much too big to list in that format.

The big 4.17 stuff was mentioned in the rc1 email when the merge window closed, but I guess it’s worth repeating how 4.17 is actually a slightly smaller kernel than 4.16, thanks to the removal of a number of effectively dead architectures (blackfin, cris, frv, m32r, metag, mn10300, score, and tile). Obviously all the other changes are much more important, but it’s always nice to see spring cleaning like that.

…..

Linux Kernel 4.17 release highlights:

  • AMDGPU DC enabled by default for the new display code stack.
  • Intel Cannonlake graphics support enabled by default.
  • Improved AMDKFD support for pre-Vega discrete GPUs.
  • Clean up lots of code for obsolete CPU architectures
  • A significant power-savings improvement on some hardware
  • And many more other changes.

How to Install Linux Kernel 4.17 in Ubuntu:

A graphical tool UKUU makes it easy to install the latest Kernels in Ubuntu.

For those who don’t want to use any third-party tool, here’s how to manually download and install Kernel 4.17 in Ubuntu (tested in Ubuntu 18.04, though it should work on all current Ubuntu releases).

The mainline kernels do not include any Ubuntu-provided drivers or patches. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use.

The mainline kernel PPA has made the new kernel binaries for Ubuntu, available for download at the link below:

Download Kernel 4.17 (.deb)

Depends on your OS type, download and install the packages in turns:

  1. linux-headers-4.17.0-xxxxxx_all.deb
  2. linux-modules-4.17.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb
  3. linux-image-xxx-4.17.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb

Select generic for common system, and lowlatency for a low latency system (e.g. for recording audio), amd64 for 64bit system, i386 for 32bit system, or armhf, arm64, etc for other OS types.

To get the Kernel 4.17 from the command console, run the commands below one by one:

For 64-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_all.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-modules-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_amd64.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_amd64.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-image-unsigned-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_amd64.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

for 32-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_all.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-modules-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_i386.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-headers-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_i386.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.17/linux-image-4.17.0-041700-generic_4.17.0-041700.201806041953_i386.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

After installed these .debs, restart and enjoy!

Uninstall Linux Kernel 4.17:

Start/restart your machine and select boot with the previous kernel in ‘Grub2 -> Advanced Option for Ubuntu’. Then use Ubuntu Tweak, or run command to remove Linux Kernel 4.17.0:

sudo dpkg --purge linux-image-unsigned-4.17.0-041700-generic linux-image-4.17.0-041700-generic

Linux Kernel

Linux Kernel 4.16 was released yesterday. Linus Torvalds announced in lkml.org:

So the take from final week of the 4.16 release looks a lot like rc7, in that about half of it is networking. If it wasn’t for that, it would all be very small and calm.

We had a number of fixes and cleanups elsewhere, but none of it made me go “uhhuh, better let this soak for another week”. And davem didn’t think the networking was a reason to delay the release, so I’m not.

End result: 4.16 is out, and the merge window for 4.17 is open and I’ll start doing pull requests tomorrow.

Outside of networking, most of the last week was various arch fixlets (powerpc, arm, x86, arm64), some driver fixes (mainly scsi and rdma) and misc other noise (documentation, vm, perf).

The appended shortlog gives an overview of the details (again, this is only the small stuff in the last week, if you want the full 4.16 changelog you’d better get the git tree and filter by your area of interest).

Linux Kernel 4.16 release highlights:

  • Spectre / Meltdown mitigation & other security updates.
  • L2 CDP support for L2 cache partitioning on Intel CPUs
  • Correct AMD Zen temperature reporting for the Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor.
  • P-State driver support for Skylake X servers.
  • POWER memory protection keys support
  • Oracle DAX driver for SPARC co-processor
  • Jailhouse guest support for non-root users

How to Install Kernel 4.16 in Ubuntu:

Other than using a graphical tool UKUU to install the latest mainline kernel packages, following steps will tell you how to manually download and install it in all current Ubuntu releases.

The mainline kernels do not include any Ubuntu-provided drivers or patches. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use.

The mainline kernel PPA has made the new kernel binaries for Ubuntu, available for download at the link below:

Download Kernel 4.16 (.deb)

Depends on your OS type, download and install the packages in turns:

  1. linux-headers-4.16.0-xxxxxx_all.deb
  2. linux-headers-4.16.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb
  3. linux-image-4.16.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb

Select generic for common system, and lowlatency for a low latency system (e.g. for recording audio), amd64 for 64bit system, i386 for 32bit system, or armhf, arm64, etc for other OS types.

To get the Kernel 4.16 from the command console, run the commands below one by one:

For 64-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_all.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_amd64.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-image-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_amd64.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

for 32-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_all.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-headers-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_i386.deb

wget -c http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.16/linux-image-4.16.0-041600-generic_4.16.0-041600.201804012230_amd64.deb
sudo dpkg -i *.deb

After installed these .debs, restart and enjoy!

Uninstall Linux Kernel 4.16:

Start/restart your machine and select boot with the previous kernel in Grub2 -> Advanced menu. Then use Ubuntu Tweak, or other system tool to remove the Kernel 4.16, or you may see this how to remove old kernels tutorial.

Linux Kernel

After 9 release candidates, Linux Kernel 4.15 stable was finally announced earlier today. Kernel 4.15 is the first to be fully patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities.

After a release cycle that was unusual in so many (bad) ways, this last week was really pleasant. Quiet and small, and no last-minutepanics, just small fixes for various issues. I never got a feeling that I’d need to extend things by yet another week, and 4.15 looks fine to me.“, Linus Torvalds announced.

What’s new in Kernel 4.15:

  • support for the RISC-V architecture
  • support for AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization
  • support for the User-Mode Instruction Prevention feature on Intel CPUs
  • DRM leasing support for benefiting VR use-cases on Linux.
  • The HTC Vive VR headset treated “Non-Desktop”
  • Intel Coffee Lake graphics are now considered stable
  • Nouveau driver adds support for GeForce GTX 1000 “Pascal” temperature monitoring.

How to Install Kernel 4.15 in Ubuntu:

Other than using a graphical tool UKUU to install the latest mainline kernel packages, following steps will tell you how to manually download and install it in all current Ubuntu releases.

The mainline kernels do not include any Ubuntu-provided drivers or patches. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use.

The mainline kernel PPA has made the new kernel binaries for Ubuntu, available for download at the link below:

Download Kernel 4.15 (.deb)

Depends on your OS type, download and install the packages in turns:

  1. linux-headers-4.15.0-xxxxxx_all.deb
  2. linux-headers-4.15.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb
  3. linux-image-4.15.0-xxx-generic(/lowlatency)_xxx_amd64(/i386).deb

Select generic for common system, and lowlatency for a low latency system (e.g. for recording audio), amd64 for 64bit system, i386 for 32bit system, or armhf, arm64, etc for other OS types.

To get the Kernel 4.15 from the command console, run the commands below one by one:

For 64-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.15/linux-headers-4.15.0-041500_4.15.0-041500.201801282230_all.deb

wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.15/linux-headers-4.15.0-041500-generic_4.15.0-041500.201801282230_amd64.deb

wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.15/linux-image-4.15.0-041500-generic_4.15.0-041500.201801282230_amd64.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

for 32-bit OS:

cd /tmp/

wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.15/linux-headers-4.15.0-041500_4.15.0-041500.201801282230_all.deb

wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.15/linux-headers-4.15.0-041500-generic_4.15.0-041500.201801282230_i386.deb

wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.15/linux-image-4.15.0-041500-generic_4.15.0-041500.201801282230_i386.deb

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

After installed these .debs, restart and enjoy!

Uninstall Linux Kernel 4.15:

Start/restart your machine and select boot with the previous kernel in Grub2 -> Advanced menu. Then use Ubuntu Tweak, or other system tool to remove the Kernel 4.15, or you may see this how to remove old kernels tutorial.