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Want to check your IP address, listening ports, or local network devices but hate Linux commands? Well, What IP is a simple graphical tool to do the job.

What IP is a free open-source tool written in Python 3 with GTK+ 3 framework. The software features:

  • Display public, local, and a virtual interface’s IP addresses,
  • Display the public IP location,
  • List the ports listening on your system, and check if they’re publicly reachable,
  • List all devices on local network.

display ip address

listening ports

How to Install What IP in Ubuntu:

The software is available as flatpak package in Flathub repository. Open terminal and run following commands one by one to install it in Ubuntu 20.04 (Ubuntu 18.04 needs to add flatpak PPA first).

  • 1.) Install flatpak framework by running command:
    sudo apt install flatpak
  • 2.) Add flathub repository via command:
    flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo
  • 3.) Finally install the tool via command:
    flatpak install flathub org.gabmus.whatip

(Optional) To remove What IP flatpak package, run command:

flatpak uninstall flathub org.gabmus.whatip

Fragments is an open-source GTK+ 3 BitTorrent client with a modern and easy to use user interface.

The software is written mostly in Vala programming language. You can start downloading files by one of following ways:

  • Click a magnet link one a website.
  • Copy a magnet link to the clipboard.
  • Choose a torrent file.

Fragments also features Dark Mode support, and ability to configure encryption mode.

How to Install Fragments in Ubuntu:

The software is available as Flatpak package. Open terminal from system app launcher or by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard, then run following one by one to install the package.

1.) Install Flatpak framework if you don’t have it installed via command:

sudo apt install flatpak

2.) Add flathub, the main repository hosts a large list of flatpak packages:

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

3.) Finally install the BitTorrent client via command:

flatpak install flathub de.haeckerfelix.Fragments

To update the package, run flatpak update de.haeckerfelix.Fragments

(Optional) To remove the Fragments flatpak package, run command in terminal:

flatpak uninstall de.haeckerfelix.Fragments

shutter screenshot

Looking for screen capturing application for your Ubuntu desktop? Here are 7 popular graphical tools you can try.

1. Gnome Screenshot

First of first, if you just want to take a screenshot. use the default screenshot tool by pressing PrintScreen, Alt + PrintScreen, or Shift + PrintScreen on keyboard to take screenshot of whole screen, focused app window, or selected area.

You can also launch the tool by searching for screenshot from system application launcher.

2. Flameshot

Flameshot is a powerful yet simple to use screenshot software. It starts as indicator applet with option to capture selected rectangular area.

The software features editing tools around screenshot selection area. As well, it supports for uploading to Imgur, and commands.

To install Flameshot, either search for and install it via Ubuntu Software or run command in terminal:

sudo apt install flameshot

3. Shutter

Shutter is a feature-rich screenshot application with a built-in editor.

It’s one of must installed applications on my Ubuntu. The software features:

  • Capture rectangular area.
  • Capture active window, or select an app window to capture.
  • whole screen, workspaces.
  • Capture app child window.
  • Capture menu or cascading menus from an app.
  • Capture tooltips.
  • Upload to Dropbox, Imgur, etc.
  • Edit with built-in editor, or auto-open with other system image editor.

Not sure if Shutter is still in active development, but it has been removed from Ubuntu 20.04 universe repository due to requirement of old libraries.

To install Shutter, either install snap package, or run commands one by one to get it from PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:linuxuprising/shutter

sudo apt update

sudo apt install shutter

4. Screencloud

Screencloud is a screenshot sharing software that works on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS.

It starts as an indicator applet offers menu options & keyboard shortcuts to take screenshot of selection, full-screen, and window.

Screenshot URL is automatically copied to clipboard, if you have pre-defined settings, for easy sharing with your friend. Supported online services include: Dropbox, Imgur, Google Drive, OneDrive, FTP/SFTP, Shell Script.

The software is available as Snap, so you can easily install it from Ubuntu Software. For choices, an Appimage is also available to download in the link below:

Screencloud in Github

Grab the .appimage package, make it executable in file “Properties -> Open With” dialog, and finally run it to launch the tool.

5. GIMP

If you edit images regularly with GIMP image editor, try its built-in screenshot function by going to menu File -> Create -> Screenshot ….

You’ll see a child window with options to capture window, full-screen, and selected area. And screenshot will be opened in a new GIMP window automatically.

6. Ksnip

Ksnip is a Qt-based screen capture with a built-in editor. It works on X11 and Gnome / Plasma Wayland.

It includes most features that other screenshot tools have (e.g, upload to Imgur, hotkeys, etc), and can be a great alternative to Shutter. Although it’s not perfect at the moment, the development is updating regularly.

7. Kazam

Kazam is a simple screencast application which also include features to capture screenshots. Similar to the default Gnome screenshot, it only offers basic options to capture, full-screen, window, and selection area.

To install Kazam, either use Ubuntu Software, or run command in terminal:

sudo apt install kazam

Summary:

There are also many other screenshot tools (e.g., KDE Spectacle, Deepin screenshot, xfce4-screenshooter, lximage-qt) that are either not desktop independent, or not working good in my case.

So the previous 7 tools are the best for Ubuntu so far in 2020 in my private opinion.

Warpinator is a local network file transfer application developed by Linux Mint. It is written with Python 3 and works on most Linux desktops via Flatpak package.

The software offers a simple clean interface that lists all available network machines with Warpinator running.

To send files, simply select a remote machine and click ‘Send files’ button. File transfer must be first approved by the recipient.

How to Get Warpinator:

For Linux Mint 20 and LMDE 4, the software has been made into main repositories, simply run command in terminal to install it:

sudo apt install warpinator

For Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04, and other Linux, the file transfer app is available in Flathub.

Ubuntu users can run following commands one by one to setup flatpak and install Warpinator:

  • Install flatpak framework if not installed:
    sudo apt install flatpak
  • Add flathub repository if not added:
    flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo
  • Install Warpinator flatpak package:
    flatpak install flathub org.x.Warpinator

And if you want to remove the package, run command:

flatpak uninstall org.x.Warpinator

Looking for a graphical interface for the command line youtube-dl video downloader? Tartube is a GTK+ 3 front-end written in Python 3.

Tartube is partly based on youtube-dl-gui and runs on Windows, Linux, Mac OS, and BSD. It’s a free and open-source software that can download individual videos, and even whole channels and playlists, from YouTube and all youtube-dl supported websites.

Besides downloading videos, Tartube can also organize your videos into convenient folders, alert you when livestreams are starting, and more.

How to Get Tartube:

Note it’s illegal to download any content from YouTube or any other site unless you see a “download” or get permission from the publisher. Use the software at your own risk!

The Ubuntu deb, Windows exe, Fedora rpm, and source code are available for download at the link below:

Download Tartube

For Ubuntu users, grab the .deb package and click install either via “Software Install” or “Gdebi” (if installed).

NOTE: To make the software work, you have to install youtube-dl, and in Tartube’s “system preferences” set the path to youtube-dl executable.