Archives For App Review

To check system information and hardware details in Ubuntu command console, without confused with various Linux commands, there’s a full featured CLI system information available.

There’s already a great graphical tool Hardinfo available in Ubuntu Software. For the command line tool, inxi is available to check:

  • Audio/sound card(s), driver, sound server.
  • System battery info
  • CPU output
  • Hard Disk info
  • Graphics card, driver, display server, resolution, renderer, OpenGL version.
  • General info, including processes, uptime, memory, IRC client or shell type, inxi version.
  • Memory (RAM) data (Require root)
  • Network card, driver.
  • system info, partition info, sensors output, USB data, and more.

To install inxi in Ubuntu, simply run command:

sudo apt-get install inxi

Then run man inxi to get a list of command options, or run inxi -F to get a brief output:

For more about the tool, go to inxi web page.

PDF Mix Tool is an open-source and lightweight application allows to split, merge, rotate and mix PDF files.

The software is written in C++ and depends only on Qt 5 and PoDoFo.

Right click edit PDF

The software offers official snap (containerised software package) package, so it can be easily installed from Ubuntu Software:

You can also run command in terminal instead to install the snap package:

snap install pdfmixtool

For Ubuntu 16.04, install snapd daemon if previous command does not work.

sudo apt install snapd snapd-xdg-open

Flameshot is a simple yet powerful screenshot tool with annotation feature. Other than Shutter, it’s another of my favorite screen capturing tools for Ubuntu desktop so far.

Flameshot is written by C++ with Qt5 framework. It offers a system tray icon with ‘Take Screenshot’ and ‘Configuration’ menu options.

While selecting a screen area to capture, many editing tool buttons appear at the bottom. And you can press right-click to show color picker, and Space to open the side panel.

Other software features include:

  • Customizable appearance.
  • DBus interface.
  • Upload to Imgur.

How to Install Flameshot in Ubuntu:

The software is available in Ubuntu Software for Ubuntu 18.04 and higher, however, Canonical won’t provide regular update for the package.

For the latest release, grab the .deb package for Ubuntu 18.04 bionic or Ubuntu 16.04 xenial from the link below:

Flameshot releases

then right-click the .deb package -> Open with Other Application -> Gdebi package installer. (install gdebi via command sudo apt install gdebi in terminal).

Uninstall:

To uninstall the tool, open terminal either via Ctrl+Alt+T shortcut key or from software launcher. When it opens, run command:

sudo apt remove --autoremove flameshot

Linux Kernel

There’s already a graphical tool called Ukuu which make it easy to install the latest Linux Kernels in Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

Today I’m going to show you a new command line tool called UKTools which provides:

  • uktools-upgrade, one command to install the latest Linux kernel (stable) from kernel.ubuntu.com.

  • uktools-purge, one command to remove old kernels, the first and the last two are excluded.

The tools also support cron jobs to automatically run upgrade and/or purge scripts.

NOTE that the mainline kernels are provided by Ubuntu Kernel Team for testing and debugging purposes. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use. You should only install these if they may fix a critical problem you’re having with the current kernel. Read more about mainline kernels.

How to Install UKTools in Ubuntu:

The application does not has any Ubuntu binary at the moment. However, it’s easy to compile it from the source.

1. Open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and clone the source via command:

git clone https://github.com/usbkey9/uktools && cd uktools

2. Then compile and install it via command:

make

The setup runs automatically if it’s installed successfully.

Uninstall:

Keep the uktools folder in your user root directory, so you can re-run UKTools setup, or remove the command line tool via command:

cd ~/uktools/ && make uninstall

Want to use animated wallpapers on Ubuntu desktop? Well, you can try the new awesome wallpaper manager called Komorebi.

Komorebi is an open-source animated wallpaper manager for Linux. With it, you can set your desktop background with:

  • a picture with time & date.
  • a video wallpaper.
  • a web page.

The software ships with a list of default animated wallpapers. And there’s a Wallpaper Creator allows to manually create animated wallpapers from pictures, videos, or web pages.

How to Install and Use Komorebi in Ubuntu:

You can download the 64-bit deb, so far it’s “komorebi-2.1-64-bit.deb” from the release page:

Komorebi Releases

Then install the package either via Gdebi (install it via Ubuntu Software) or by running command in terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T):

sudo dpkg -i ~/Downloads/komorebi-*.deb; sudo apt-get -f install

Once installed, launch Komorebi from your software launcher:

Then right-click on desktop, and choose Change wallpaper. There you can change animated wallpapers and do some basic settings.

Manually create animated wallpapers:

The software offers Wallpaper Creator utility. Open it from software launcher and you can do following steps to create an animated wallpaper from pic, video, or a web page.

1. When Wallpaper Creator launches:

  • type a name for the new wallpaper.
  • choose source type: picture, video, or web page.
  • choose source file directory.
  • finally you must choose a thumbnail image.

2. In next window, do some date & time, and other settings.

3. Due to permissions issue, you MUST move the new created wallpaper to /System/Resources/Komorebi/ as the last window prompts:

Open terminal from software launcher and run command as the picture shows you. In my case it’s: