Archives For modify ubuntu

menu have icons, button have icons

Want to add icons in Ubuntu context menus, window menus and buttons? Well, it’s very easy because Ubuntu by default provides an option to enable / disable them.

All you need to do is follow the steps below. Works on Ubuntu 12.04, Ubuntu 12.10, Ubuntu 13.04, Ubuntu 13.10, Ubuntu 14.04 Unity Desktop.

First take a look at result:

Ubuntu menu and button have icons

Ubuntu menu and button have icons

Method 1: If you’re familiar with Linux commands, press Ctrl+Alt+T to open terminal and run commands below:

To enable menu have icons, run:

gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface menus-have-icons true

To enable button have icons, run:

gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface buttons-have-icons true

Replace the value true with false in previous commands to disable them again if you want.

Method 2: Need a graphical interface? Well, search for and install dconf editor or dconf-tools in Ubuntu Software Center.

Then open it from Unity Dash, navigate to org/gnome/desktop/interface. Check on the boxes after button-have-icons and menu-have-icons in right and that’s it.

enable menu have icons via dconf editor

enable menu have icons via dconf editor

This quick tutorial is going to show you how to display or re-hide ‘hidden’ startup applications in Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander.

There’s a built-in utility in Ubuntu, which allows to add, remove, and edit additional startup applications. By default the system auto-start services are hidden, here’s how to show it in the box.

Before:

no apps startup applications utility in ubuntu 13.10

no apps in startup applications utility in ubuntu 13.10

After:

show hidden apps in startup applications

show hidden apps in startup applications

To get started, press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, run command below:

sudo sed -i 's/NoDisplay=true/NoDisplay=false/g' /etc/xdg/autostart/*.desktop

Then re-open the utility and you’ll see all ‘hidden’ apps.

If you just want to change some settings and then hide them again, run this command in terminal:

sudo sed -i 's/NoDisplay=false/NoDisplay=true/g' /etc/xdg/autostart/*.desktop

That’s it. Enjoy!

Ubuntu 13.10 hostname

This simple tutorial shows you how to change computer name or hostname in Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander.

The deafult name was set while installing Ubuntu. You can easily change it to whatever you want in both Desktop & Server by editing the host file.

Tutorial Objectives:

  • Change Computer Name or Hostname in Ubuntu 13.10
  • Enjoy!

To get started, press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, run command below to check out your current hostname:

hostname

Then run command below the edit the host files. For Ubuntu Server, replace gedit with vim or other editor.

sudo gedit /etc/hostname /etc/hosts

It opens both hostname & hosts files in two tabs. There changes the 2 names to what you want.

change Computer name ubuntu

change Computer name ubuntu

There’re lots of white dots on default LightDM login screen, which is quite annoying. This quick tip shows you how to remove them in Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy.

See the screenshot before and after:

login screen with white dots

login screen with white dots

login screen without white dots

login screen without white dots

To get started:

Press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, run:

1. Run command to allow user lightdm to create a connection to the X server:

sudo xhost +SI:localuser:lightdm

2. Then switch to user lightdm in the terminal window.

sudo su lightdm -s /bin/bash

3. Finally set draw grid (white dots) feature to false:

gsettings set com.canonical.unity-greeter draw-grid false

That’s it.

If you’re not comfortable with command console. You can use Ubuntu-Tweak, it has an option to turn off this feature under Tweaks -> Login Settings -> unlock -> turn off draw grid.

ubuntu-tweak-remove-white-dots

intel graphics

This tutorial is going to show you how to enable hardware acceleration on Intel graphics cards using VDPAU driver.

VDPAU is an open-source library and API allows to video programs to offload portions of the video decoding process and video post-processing to the GPU video-hardware. If VDPAU available, CPU usage can be significantly lower.

Applications that uses VDPAU:

  • Avidemux as of version 2.6
  • Boxee
  • GStreamer
  • MPlayer
  • MythTV
  • XBMC Media Center
  • XBMC Live
  • Xine
  • MLT
  • Adobe Flash 10.2 Stage Video and later versions (32-bit only presently)
  • VLC media player 2.1

VDPAU is not available on Intel graphics cards. Fortunately, there’s an open-source project called libvdpau-va-gl, which is a VDPAU driver that uses OpenGL under the hood to accelerate drawing and scaling, and VA-API (if available) to accelerate video decoding. You can use it on some Intel chips.

Install libvdpau-va-gl via PPA on Ubuntu

Press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard to open terminal. When it opens, run below commands one by one (Supports Ubuntu 13.10, 13.04, 12.10, 12.04).

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install libvdpau-va-gl1

To install the VAAPI drivers for Intel HD Graphics:

sudo apt-get install i965-va-driver

To launch an application with the driver, for example, launch firefox:

VDPAU_DRIVER=va_gl firefox

To force Adobe Flash to use the hardware acceleration:

sudo mkdir -p /etc/adobe
echo "EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1" | sudo tee /etc/adobe/mms.cfg
echo "OverrideGPUValidation=1" | sudo tee -a /etc/adobe/mms.cfg

To enable the driver for system-wide (not recommended):

sudo sed -i "s/^# \[/\[/g" /etc/X11/Xsession.d/20vdpau-va-gl
sudo sed -i "s/^# export/ export/g" /etc/X11/Xsession.d/20vdpau-va-gl

via: libvdpau-va-gl on Github | webupd8