For those prefer the classic .deb package, the Krita Lime PPA is finally updated with the latest v4.4.8 package for Ubuntu 20.04, Linux Mint 20 and Ubuntu 21.04.

Krita Lime PPA:

Krita provides official Linux binaries in a few package formats, e.g., Flatpak and Appimage. The Krita Lime PPA (Personal Package Archive) is one of them maintained by Alexey Samoilov, which provides the classic deb packages of the graphics editor for all current Ubuntu releases (so far Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 21.04) and their based systems, e.g, Linux Mint 20, Elementary OS 6 and Zorin OS 16.

For unknown reason the PPA package stopped at v4.4.3 for almost half an year, missing a few release updates. And finally it’s updated today with the recent Krita 4.4.8 package for Ubuntu 20.04 and Ubuntu 21.04, while the Ubuntu 18.04 package is still being working.

Install the Latest Krita from the PPA

For those sticking to the apt package, you can add the PPA and upgrade the digital painting software via following steps.

1.) Add Krita Lime PPA.

Firstly, click the top-left ‘Activities’ button to bring up overview screen, then search for and open terminal. Or search for and open terminal from your system start menu.

When terminal opens, paste the command below into it and hit Enter:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kritalime/ppa

For running sudo command you have to type user password to authenticate, and then hit Enter to continue.

2.) Install or Upgrade Krita.

After adding the PPA repository, you can now open system update manager (Software Updater) app and upgrade this popular digital painting and 2D animation software if an old version was installed.

Or just run this command in a terminal window to install or upgrade it:

sudo apt install krita

Once installed, launch it from your system start menu and enjoy!

Uninstall Krita and Remove the PPA:

It’s always easy to remove the packages from your system. Also open a terminal window and run the command below will do the job:

sudo apt remove --autoremove krita krita-data

To remove the PPA, simply add --remove flag in the command used to add it. So the command will be:

sudo add-apt-repository --remove ppa:kritalime/ppa

Or open the Software & Updates utility and remove relevant line from ‘Other Software’ tab.

KeePass Password Safe 2.49 released with user interface improvements and minor new features. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu via PPA.

According to the release note, the new release added new dedicated context menus for custom string fields and auto-type associations in the entry dialog. Allows to copy names, values, target windows and sequences, copy and paste items, and do select all and move to actions. The button “More” is present to the right of the custom string fields and auto-type associations list to show the context menu.

The release also added optional “Auto-Type – Enabled” and “Auto-Type – Sequences” main entry list column. They are disabled by default and can be turned on via menu “View -> Configure Columns”.

KeePass 2.49 added support for importing Keeper 16.0.0 JSON files, and automatic screen reader detection based on the operating system’s screen reader parameter. Other changes include:

  • New ‘Show confirmation dialog when opening a database file whose minor format version is unknown’ option.
  • Dialog banners can now be read by screen readers
  • Added accessibility names for some controls
  • Controls in the accessibility/automation control tree are now ordered by their visual locations
  • Various accessibility enhancements and other improvements.

How to Install KeePass 2.49 in Ubuntu:

KeePass 2.x runs on Linux through Mono, the open-source .NET Framework-compatible software framework. The UI looks old. If you don’t like it, try KeePassX the native Linux password manager.

The software does not provide Linux binary package so far. Besides building from the source, you can use the unofficial Ubuntu PPA.

NOTE: I offer no warranty for any package in the PPA. Build rules and patches borrowed from the Julian Taylor’s PPA. Use it at your own risk.

1.) Firstly, open terminal from start menu and run command to add the PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntuhandbook1/keepass2

Type user password when it asks since sudo command need user authentication and hit Enter to continue

2.) Then run command to update package cache, though it’s done automatically in Ubuntu 20.04 & higher while adding PPA:

sudo apt update

3.) Finally install this mono based password manager package by running command:

sudo apt install keepass2

By keeping the Ubuntu PPA, next time a new release is published you’ll be able to upgrade it using system’s Software Updater (Update Manager) utility.

Uninstall KeePass2:

To remove the software package, run command in terminal:

sudo apt remove --autoremove keepass2

And remove the Ubuntu PPA either via command in temrinal:

sudo add-apt-repository --remove ppa:ubuntuhandbook1/keepass2

or by launching “Software & Updates” utility and removing the relevant line under “Other Software” tab.

YOGA Image Optimizer is a graphical tool to batch convert photos into JPEG, PNG and WEBP, and compress file sizes while having equivalent quality.

It’s a free and open-source tool based on YOGA command line tool, which can also convert and optimize 3D models from various formats to glTF and GLB.

YOGA:

The YOGA backend uses Python Pillow library to convert images into PNG, JPEG, or WebP as you prefer. And it uses Google’s Guetzli library to generate JPEG that are typically 20-30% smaller than libjpeg while having some quality. Google’s Zopflipng and libwebp libraries are in use for optimizing other two image formats.

The command line tool also support converting and optimizing 3D models using the Open Asset Import Library (Assimp).

YOGA Image Optimizer:

The official front-end for YOGA provides an easy to use graphical interface to do converting and optimizing process in Linux and Windows.

Simply open a batch of photo images (press Shift or Ctrl while choosing files), it shows the thumbnails, input file name and size, as well as output name and file format.

Before you clicking “Optimize”, you can choose output format and set compress level for each or a selection of images.

YOGA Image Optimizer also features:

  • Multi-thread support. You can set how many CPU cores to use.
  • GTK theme support. It allows to choose between all installed GTK theme for the app only.
  • Dark Mode.
  • Custom output pattern.

Install YOGA Image Optimizer in Ubuntu Linux:

For Linux, the software can be installed either via universal Flatpak package or using pip (Python Package Installer).

1. Flatpak Package

Open terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard, you can then run following commands one by one to get the software via Flatpak in Ubuntu 20.04 and higher. For Ubuntu 18.04, you need to add this PPA before getting started.

a. ) Install the flatpak daemon if you don’t have it:

sudo apt install flatpak

b.) Add the Flathub the preferred repository hosting Flatpak package:

flatpak remote-add --if-not-exists flathub https://flathub.org/repo/flathub.flatpakrepo

c.) Finally install the image converter and optimizer via command:

flatpak install flathub org.flozz.yoga-image-optimizer

(Optional) For any reason, you can easily remove the software by running command in temrinal:

flatpak uninstall --delete-data org.flozz.yoga-image-optimizer

2. Install the package via pip3:

For those don’t like the Flatpak package, use the Python pip3 package installer. It however does NOT create app shortcut for launching it from the ‘Show Applications’ start menu.

a.) Firstly, open terminal and run command to install required libraries:

sudo apt install git build-essential python3 python3-dev python3-pip libgirepository1.0-dev libcairo2-dev pkg-config gir1.2-gtk-3.0

b.) Next install the package via command:

sudo pip3 install yoga-image-optimizer

The pip package does not has app shortcut, you need to either run yoga-image-optimizer command to start it from terminal and create a .desktop file manually.

(Optional) To remove the package, use command:

sudo pip3 install yoga-image-optimizer

For those don’t like the Flatpak package, here’s how to install GIMP 2.99.6 from PPA in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

The popular GIMP image editor is working on the next major 3.0 release. For testing purpose, GIMP 2.99.6 was released as the latest development version. It provides the official Linux package via Flatpak package. However, some users don’t like it, since Flatpak is an universal package format needs separate daemon to run in sandbox.

Install GIMP 3.0 Dev from PPA in Ubuntu 20.04:

For Ubuntu 20.04 and derivatives, e.g, Linux Mint 20 and Zorin OS 16, the unofficial PPA contains the classic .deb package for GIMP 3.0 Dev release.

NOTE: The package in the PPA is unstable. It may have bugs and used only for testing purpose. Installing GIMP from this PPA will override the 2.10 stable release, don’t install it on production machine.

1. Add the PPA.

Press Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard to open terminal, or search for and open terminal from start menu if you’re on Linux Mint or ZorinOS.

When terminal opens, copy and paste the command below and hit Run to add the PPA:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mati75/gimp30

Type your password as sudo command need user authentication, and hit Enter to continue.

2. Update package cache

Since Ubuntu 20.04, it updates the system package cache automatically while adding Ubuntu PPAs, However, Linux Mint 20 does not. So you may need to manually run command in terminal to update cache:

sudo apt update

3. Install / Upgrade to GIMP 3.0 Dev

Finally, you can either open Software Updater (Update Manager) to install or upgrade the GIMP package, or run command in terminal instead:

sudo apt install gimp gegl

Revert to GIMP 2.10 Stable:

It’s possible to downgrade the image editor back to 2.10 stable release, 2.10.18 if no other relevant PPA added.

Simply open terminal and run the command below to install the ppa-purge package, and then purge the Ubuntu PPA which will remove it as well as downgrade installed packages:

sudo apt install ppa-purge && sudo ppa-purge ppa:mati75/gimp30

That’s all. Enjoy!

Mozilla Firefox 92.0 was released today with new features and various security fixes.

The release will use HTTPS resource record (HTTPS RR) as Alt-Svc headers to make connections more secure.

The full-range color (0-255) levels are now supported for video playback. Though the limited color range (16-235) is ideal for movies and TV, the source can be switched to full-range color to match PC monitor.

For Mac, users can now access the macOS share options from the Firefox File menu. And it enables support for images containing ICC v4 profiles.

Other changes include:

  • Firefox performance with screen readers and other accessibility tools is no longer severely degraded if Mozilla Thunderbird is installed or updated after Firefox.
  • macOS VoiceOver now correctly reports buttons and links marked as ‘expanded’ using the aria-expanded attribute.
  • An open alert in a tab no longer causes performance issues in other tabs using the same process.
  • The bookmark toolbar menus on macOS now follow Firefox visual styles.
  • Certificate error pages have been redesigned for a better user experience.

How to Install Firefox 92:

Usually, Ubuntu will publish the new Firefox package in next few days. The best choice is just wait!

You’ll see the packages in Software Updater once published:

Or see the release note & download the Linux portable package from this page.